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the suburbs are killing the sand here is why and cities can save us and here is why. by far the greatest aspect of that epidemic or i should say of our health challenge in america is the obesity epidemic, not that obesity itself is a problem but all the illnesses it leads to, diabetes consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america becoming a diabetic. we are looking at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. that is not a huge surprise to you. we of all been talking for a long time about the wonders of the american corn syrup based diets and the sodas people a drinking but only recently has the argument, have studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity, one of them in england was called gluttony vs loss. another doctor at the mayo clinic put patients electronic underwear and measured every motion, set a certain dietetic regime, studied their weight, started pumping calories in and some people got fat and other people didn't, expecting some sort of metabolic factor at wo
economies and more specifically, city economies. similarly we talk about manufacturing as a category, that's a little overbroad because manufacturing is a million subcategories that added to this pos or ble category. so the same way you broke down and said here's the specific cities do well and can have lessons for the american economy in the aggregate, what are some subset is right now that is a leading-edge the rest of the super sector came learn from? >> just a pretty fine point on your initial comment, top mattress in the united states said on 12% of land ask him a two of population, three quarters of gdp and on every asset that matters, 75, 80, 85% national share. so it's really hard to talk about an american economy. you really have to talk about network throughout the rest of the world. for a long time we focused a lot on the consumption economy in a wal-mart is that wal-mart is a wal-mart about whether phoenix, pittsburgh, denver, detroit. same footprint, seem designed, same price as, wages. when you start looking at advanced manufacturing, what you see is the effective cost areas
. the city of bridgeport, conn., which is one of the poorest cities in the country in pretty much everyone in between. my district also sets -- sits for miles south of the town called new town which unfortunately became a big part of the public imagination several weeks ago when the tragedy occurred there. one of the many things that happened to all of us, not just those of us who live close, but all of us in this country was in the face of unspeakable tragedy we felt, maybe for the first time in a long time the fact that we have a lot more in common than we have things separating yes. all the trivialities to all of the conceits kamal the day-to-day concerns that we have fallaway. we don't want that sort of thing to have to remind us of that bottom line fact. the truth is that all the issues we struggle with, whether medicare or social security, welfare of grandparents, whether it is how much we tax, invest, how good our system of education is to all of those things at their core is the notion that we want the same for the kids of bridgeport as the kids in greenwich. there's an awful lot m
the economic privilege to move to a different city or neighborhood. that is not freedom. that is not freedom. [applause] you will never be -- you will never be free until every single one of us feels safe to express others sexually, intellectually, and spirit and support our homes, places of work. >> i'm beyond hope. i know, i know that our movement can do something extraordinary. we set our intentions behind it. i know, we will not leave any one of us behind. we must not leave any of our families or family members behind. when we win federal marriage equality, we will. we must not leave behind the 31 states that will sit need to overturn the constitutional bans on marriage equality. [applause] we must not be satisfied with some state that's have marriage and others that do not. we must not leave behind those who will choose not to get married. [applause] we must not leave behind those in the 29 states that have no protection for lgbt people. we must not leave behind those just because they adopt live in a big city can't kiss their lover on the street. we must not leave behind the transgende
we have the economic privilege to move to a different city or neighborhood. that is not freedom. that is not freedom. [applause] you will never be -- you will never be free until every single one of us feels safe to express others sexually, intellectually, and spirit and support our homes, places of work. >> i'm beyond hope. i know, i know that our movement can do something extraordinary. we set our intentions behind it. i know, we will not leave any one of us behind. we must not leave any of our families or family members behind. when we win federal marriage equality, we will. we must not leave behind the 31 states that will sit need to overturn the constitutional bans on marriage equality. [applause] we must not be satisfied with some state that's have marriage and others that do not. we must not leave behind those who will choose not to get married. [applause] we must not leave behind those in the 29 states that have no protection for lgbt people. we must not leave behind those just because they adopt live in a big city can't kiss their lover on the street. we must not leave
-span: the rape of nanking, 1937, was what? >> guest: that was when the japanese troops entered the city of nanking and, again, just like the death march, this crazy evil took over, and they spent systematically murdering and raping hundred -- almost 100,000 women. it was another one of the great atrocities of world war ii. c-span: were -- were any american nurses ever raped by the japanese? >> guest: they were not. there was an attempted rape on corregidor by a japanese soldier after the surrender. one of the things the nurses -- and they had no guideline to go by, nothing to follow, so they said, 'look, we're gonna stay together as a group.' they figured there'd be safety in numbers. and they all slept in this one lateral, one tunnel. but one of the nurses decided she was gonna sleep someplace else, and one night a japanese soldier climbed over the -- the wall and tried to rape her. she escaped. but that was as nearest as any sexual assault happened with the nurses. c-span: what -- do you know the name of that nurse? >> guest: yes. it was mary brown menzies. c-span: is she still alive?
but in reality if you can't cover the whole city would do a lot of things that one swat team can never be decisive and that is where we found ourselves, significant evolution, where we began to change. >> in somalia, the task force ranger had been there a month or two before the big battle that i wrote about and during that period they launched six so the path, the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets, planning and operations, once that intelligence came together, launching a rage . describe what tempo means >> you get into and make a decision and set criteria to lunch when the criteria come. it is a pretty centralized, pretty deliberate process. when we got in iraq we were all originally doing that and have this precise thing and we found we were having an effect that very narrow affect, very slow affect and when we would go to pick up an individual that may or may not be a fight. if we capture him and his computer and his phone, capture all those things, but one of our small forces around the country would do the operation, might take a day or two to send the individual b
standing in the rubble of city hall was something. -- >> the people there who had been in shelters for almost a month were very upset that the war ended. there what it finished. will live in shelters for three months. this will be the end of it, but his idea was that burns increase . we rebuilt and we prepared for the next time because someday we will be the gateway to israeli commando lebanese will come and who will have dinner together. that is our goal. we want to be the gateway to the north. he was all about building. in rebuilding. planting. trees are a very big deal and is well. the only country in the world that has more trees at the turn of the 25th century than it had at the beginning of the 20th century. and everybody pleasantries. every time a turnaround. the first thing they do is go out and plant trees. more trees. that is what he talked about. it is a defiance of what it is also a spirit of bill the and life. people were sorry the war ended when it did, and everyone knew it ended badly. they wanted to be able to have peace and live their lives again. that's what they
places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home their, which we did 11 years ago. so hazel and i have been there all that time and our daughter khalia went to high school there and finished high school and came back here to college and so that was one reason the. i was also wary -- weary, tired of the struggle that had depleted me. america had worn me out. simply because there are things that can't be talked about, has no tolerance for that kind of honesty and has no plans to make anything right. as if it says, and and i heard it say we have stopped the act of crime, and so if there is damage, then we are walking away from that. it's as if to say at the end of slavery, you could sort of like in this to two runners in the race. you take it done and shoot one runner in both leg
president was city editor of the atlanta journal, they counted competition, and everyone in georgia came to know jack nelson as one of the most incisive and aggravating reporters who ever lived. i can say all the epithet's i heard described, one was his and. that has a connotation that is always burrowing in where they ought not to be. they should not be exposed to different people. jack would do that and was incredible success and sometimes under unbelievable danger. the first time he came to georgia he was inducted, went into the national guard, inducted to go to the korean war. he went to fort stewart, georgia and became a staff sergeant. if you read the book you find out he never learned how to shoot a rifle, never had any basic training at all, he was promoted above the other people who came with him from biloxi to the army and did that because he was a reporter and expert at publicizing his commanding officer's great exploits. he did this by becoming friends with all the editors of newspapers up and down the coast from savannah to florida. he ingratiated himself there and finally w
, health care is much like other sectors of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of nuke city. his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a masters at nyu. he then became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers were headed frontmost seat to fannie and freddie, which something we might hear more from in the q&a. then he got involved in television and ceo of the game show network and came to help policy writing very late in life because it is tragic that affected his father. he wrote a cover story in the atlantic magazine. and turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book which i encourage all of you to buy the there's copied outside and i'm also instructed to say that the next season of american bible challenge, the game show network highest-rated show, is coming on in a few weeks of the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo from his ceo duties and we are giving them a plug, too. so please join in welcoming david gold hill. i'm sure we're going to a lot from him today. [applaus
economies and even more specifically city economies. and similarly, it strikes me ma that when we talk about manufacturing as a category, that's a little overbroad, because manufacturing is, in fact, 1,000, million little subcategories that add up to this bls o bea category of manufacturing. you broke down and said here's what specific cities are doing well and can have lessons for the american economy in the aggregate. what are some specific manufacturing sub sectors that are the cutting leading edge that the rest of this super subsector can learn from? >> top 100 metros in the united states, they sit on 12% of our landmass, they're two-thirds of our population, three-quarters of our gdp, and on every asset and indicator that matters they're at 75%, 80%, 85%, 90% of national share. so it's really hard to talk about an american economy. you have to talk about a network of met meth rho poll tan economies and same throughout the rest of the world. for a long time i think we focused a lot on the consumption economy. you know, and a walmart is a walmart is a walmart. you know, whether it's in ph
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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